Duke in Venice

Semester Program

An International Academic Experience

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Courses Taught in English

Duke in Venice is based at Venice International University (VIU) located on the island of San Servolo. VIU is an association of universities and organizations from around the world. Faculty from the partner universities offer courses at VIU, all taught in English. 

Duke in Venice students enroll in the VIU Globalization Program of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. The program brings together talented, motivated students from VIU member universities in a truly multicultural, international, and interdisciplinary environment. 

Although no previous knowledge of Italian is required, it is strongly recommended that students begin study of the language before arriving in Venice. Italian language will be a required course for students on the program.

See VIU member universities

PROGRAM FAST FACTS

Location: Venice, Italy

Term: Fall, Spring, or Academic Year

Dates: September 3, 2017–December 18, 2017 (Fall); February 3, 2018–June 1, 2018 (Spring)

Application Deadline: March 1 (Fall and Academic Year), October 1 (Spring)

Academic Theme(s): Italian History and Culture, Cultures of the World, Global Challenges

Credit Type: Duke Credit

Eligibility: Non-Duke students are welcome to apply.

Housing: Dormitory and apartments

GEO Advisor: Alayne Wood

  • Venice, Italy

  • The Grand Canal, Venice, Italy

  • Church of San Giorgio Maggiore

  • Venice, Italy

  • Aerial photo of San Servolo Island

  • Aerial photo of San Servolo Island

  • Open Air Lesson at VIU

ACADEMICS

The normal courseload is 4 courses. You will choose from among a listing of 15-20 courses that are English-taught by Duke and other university faculty at VIU. One of the four courses you are required to take is an Italian language course, appropriate to your language ability and background.

Core Coures

A set of core courses is available every semester, and these courses fall within three broad themes:

  • Italy: History of Venice, Italian Contemporary History in Films, Art and Architecture in Renaissance Venice, Italian Fashion and Design
  • Cultures of the World: Intercultural Communication, Gender Studies, Comparing East and West
  • Global Challenges: Identity, Heritage, and Globalization; Globalization, Ethics, Welfare, and Human Rights; Global Governance for Peace and Security, Cooperation and Development

Specialized Tracks

In addition, two specialization tracks are offered each semester:

  • Economics, Management, and Digital Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage (Fall only)
  • Environmental Management and Sustainable Development (Spring only)

Within these broad sectors, the subject matter, resident faculty, and the departments to which the courses pertain change with each semester. GEO works closely with departments at Duke to determine which Duke prefixes and number designations the courses will carry.

 

  • CORE COURSES
  • FALL 2017
  • SPRING 2018
  • FALL 2018

CORE COURSES

Core Courses

The following courses are offered every semester on the Duke in Venice program:

Italian Contemporary History in Films (P)
Luca Pes,Venice International University
HISTORY 390A-12  (CCI, CZ, ALP)

History of Venice (P)
Luca Pes,Venice International University
HISTORY 390A-12  (CZ)

Italian for Foreigners (various levels) (P)
Massimo Brunzin (coordinator)
Venice International University
ITALIAN 101A (FL)
ITALIAN 102
ITALIAN 203 (FL, CZ)
ITALIAN 302A

Art and Architecture on Renaissance Venice (P)
Paola Modesti
Venice International University/Università degli Studi di Padova
ARTHIST 390A  (ALP, CZ)

FALL 2017

Fall 2017 Courses

Please note these courses are subject to change. For more information about these courses, including the course syllabi, please see the VIU Website.

These courses will be taught by the Duke faculty member in residence and faculty from the partner universities. These courses will carry Duke departmental designations and numbers.

Cultural Heritage Track

Anthropology of Art at La Biennale
Natalie Göltenboth, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
CULANTH 290A (CZ)
POLSCI 290A (CZ)

The Architectural and Urban Heritage of Venice before and after the Collapse of the Republic
Guido Zucconi/Isabella di Lenardo
Università Iuav di Venezia
ARTHIST 390A (ALP)

Comparing East and West - Comparative Studies on Religious Liberties
Hiroshi Nishihara, Waseda University
CULANTH 290A
ICS 390A

Critical Food Studies: Culture(s) and the Global Politics of Food
Charlie Thompson, Duke University
CULANTH 290A (SS)
DOCST 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Digital Humanities: Web Resources, Tools and Infrastructures
TBD
ISS 390A

Economics and Management of the Arts
Bruno Bernardi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
ARTHIST 390A (ALP, SS)
ECON 290A (ALP, SS)
MMS 390A (ALP, SS)

Gender Studies
Andreas Ziegler, Université de Lausanne
GSF 290A (SS, CCI)
POLSCI 290A (SS, CCI)
PUBPOL 390A (SS, CCI)

Globalization, Ethics, Welfare and Human Rights
Natalie Göltenboth, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
ICS 390A (SS, EI)
POLSCI 290A (SS, EI)
PUBPOL 390A (SS, EI)
SOCIOL 290A (SS, EI)

Global Governance for Peace and Security, Cooperation and Development
Sara De Vido, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
POLSCI 290A
PUBPOL 390A

How to Begin Thinking:Some Versions of the 20th-Century History, Philosophy, Literature and Theory
Kevin Newmark, Boston College
ENGLISH 390A
LIT 390A-13

The Imaginary City: Why Writers Love Venice
Kevin Newmark, Boston College
ENGLISH 390A (ALP, CCI)
LIT 390A-13 (ALP, CCI)

Intercultural Communication
Vincenzo Romania, Università degli Studi di Padova
TBD

International Organizations and Their Role in Preservation of Cultural Heritage
TBD
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

International Organizations - Law and Politics: The Example of Their Role in the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Andreas Ziegler, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Let's Kill the Moonlight: The Early 20th Century Avant-Garde Performative Movements
TBD
THEATRST 390A (ALP)

Patterns of Democracy and Forms of Government: Comparing Western and Islamic Traditions
Andrea Buratti, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Fundamental Rights, Individuals and Groups in Multicultural Societies
Massimo Papa, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Re-Contextualizing Drama in Different Cultures: The Case of Ibsen
Gad Kaynar, Tel Aviv University
LIT 390A-13 (ALP, CCI)
THEATRST 390A (ALP, CCI)

Social Documentary as Global Phenomenon
Charlie Thompson, Duke University
CULANTH 290A (SS)
DOCST 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Social Exclusion and Human Rights
Hiroshi Nishihara, Waseda University
POLSCI 290A
PUBPOL 390A
SOCIOL 290A

Training in UNESCO World Heritage Studies
Giorgio Gianighian, Università Iuav di Venezia
CULANTH 290A (ALP, SS)
PUBPOL 390A (ALP, SS)

SPRING 2018

Spring 2018 Courses

Please note these courses are subject to change. For more information about these courses, including the course syllabi, please see the VIU Website.

These courses will be taught by the Duke faculty member in residence and faculty from the partner universities. These courses will carry Duke departmental designations and numbers.

Core Courses

History of Venice

Italian Contemporary History in Films

Art and Architecture in Renaissance Venice

Italian for Foreigners (Beginner, Intermediate, Upper-Intermediate Levels)

Sustainable Development Track

Cinema and Video Art
Marina Pellanda, Università Iuav di Venezia
TBD

Cities, Global Change and Sustainable Development
Margherita Turvani, Università Iuav di Venezia
ENVIRON 390A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

The City in Film
Marina Pellanda, Università Iuav di Venezia
TBD

Climate Change and Forced Migration from an International Legal and Ethical Perspective
Richard Powers, Boston College
TBD

Communicating Media and Politics in a Globalized World
Marcel Burger, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Comparative Studies on Right to Education and Nationalism
Hiroshi Nishihara, Waseda University
TBD

Comparing East and West: Law and Ethics
Richard Powers, Boston College
TBD

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Alessio D'Amato, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
TBD

The Economics of Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy 
Alessio D'Amato, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
TBD

Gender Studies
Luca Trappolin/Paolo Gusmeroli, Padova
TBD

Global Governance for Peace and Security, Cooperation and Development
Sara De Vido, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Globalization, Environment and Sustainable Development
Ignazio Musu/Ilda Mannino, Venice International University
CULANTH 290A (SS, EI)
ENVIRON 390A (SS, EI)
EOS 390A (SS, EI)
POLSCI 290A (SS, EI)
PUBPOL 390A (SS, EI)

Globalization, Ethics, Welfare and Human Rights: Comparative Studies on Discrimination and Equality
Hiroshi Nishihara, Waseda University
ICS 390A (SS, EI)
POLSCI 290A (SS, EI)
PUBPOL 390A (SS, EI)
SOCIOL 290A (SS, EI)

Globalization in a Changing World Economy
Yannick Lung, Université de Bordeaux
ECON 290A (SS)
SOCIOL 290A (SS)

Identity, Heritage and Globalization: Social Innovation through Arts, Creativity and Academic Knowledge in Venice
Guido Borelli/Mairuzio Busacca, Venezia
TBD

Innovation and Social Changes
Yannik Lung, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Intercultural Communication
TBD

Introduction to Energy Politics
Irina Mironova/Jack Sharples, European University at St. Petersburg
TBD

Italian Fashion Design
TBD

Port Cities in the Age of Empire
Simon Partner, Duke University
TBD

Rewriting the History of the Occident: The Apocalyptic Visions of Michel Houellebecq
Lars SchneiderLudwig Maximilians Universität
TBD

Societal Issues of the Automobile
Yannick Lung, Université de Bordeaux 
SOCIOL 290A (CZ)

Welfare, Equity and Public Intervention: Challenges from Global Problems
Alessio D'Amato, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
TBD

What Did Your Grandparents Do? An Intercultural Exploration of Individual Life Histories
Simon Partner, Duke University
TBD

World Oil and Gas Markets
Irina Mironova/Jack Sharples, European University at St. Petersburg
TBD

FALL 2018

Fall 2018 Courses

Please note these courses are subject to change. For more information about these courses, including the course syllabi, please see the VIU Website.

These courses will be taught by the Duke faculty member in residence and faculty from the partner universities. These courses will carry Duke departmental designations and numbers.

Cultural Heritage Track

Anthropology of Art at La Biennale
Natalie Göltenboth, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
CULANTH 290A (CZ)
POLSCI 290A (CZ)

The Architectural and Urban Heritage of Venice before and after the Collapse of the Republic
Guido Zucconi/Isabella di Lenardo
Università Iuav di Venezia
ARTHIST 390A (ALP)

Comparing East and West - Comparative Studies on Religious Liberties
Gunter Zöller, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
CULANTH 290A
ICS 390A

Critical Food Studies: Culture(s) and the Global Politics of Food
Charlie Thompson, Duke University
TBD

Early Modern Print Culture (in the Digital Age)
Kirsten Stirling, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Economics and Management of the Arts
Bruno Bernardi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
ARTHIST 390A (ALP, SS)
ECON 290A (ALP, SS)
MMS 390A (ALP, SS)

Gender Studies
Luca Trappolin/Angela Toffanin, Università degli Studi di Padova
TBD

Globalization, Ethics, Welfare and Human Rights
Natalie Göltenboth, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
ICS 390A (SS, EI)
POLSCI 290A (SS, EI)
PUBPOL 390A (SS, EI)
SOCIOL 290A (SS, EI)

Global Governance for Peace and Security, Cooperation and Development
Sara De Vido, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
POLSCI 290A
PUBPOL 390A

How to Begin Thinking:Some Versions of the 20th-Century History, Philosophy, Literature and Theory
Kevin Newmark, Boston College
ENGLISH 390A
LIT 390A-13

Humans and Global Bugs - An Introduction to Demographic and Epidemiological Modelling
Gianpaolo Scalia Tomba, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
TBD

The Imaginary City: Why Writers Love Venice
Kevin Newmark, Boston College
ENGLISH 390A (ALP, CCI)
LIT 390A-13 (ALP, CCI)

Intercultural Communication
TBD

International Organizations - Law and Politics: The Example of Their Role in the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Andreas Ziegler, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Nature by Numbers? An Introduction to Mathematical Modelling of Nature and Humanity
Gianpaolo Scalia Tomba, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
TBD

Patterns of Democracy and Forms of Government: Comparing Western and Islamic Traditions
Andrea Buratti, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Philosophers, Rebels, Tyrants
Gerald Easter, Boston College
TBD

Politics and Propaganda in Films
Gerald Easter, Boston College
TBD

Fundamental Rights, Individuals and Groups in Multicultural Societies
Massimo Papa, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata"
POLSCI 290A (SS)
PUBPOL 390A (SS)

Re-Contextualizing Drama in Different Cultures: The Case of Ibsen
Gad Kaynar, Tel Aviv University
TBD

Rule the Waves. Maritime Empires Between Politics and Commerce
Gunter Zöller, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
TBD

Shakespeare in Venice and Verona
Kirsten Stirling, Université de Lausanne
TBD

Social Documentary as Global Phenomenon
Charlie Thompson, Duke University
TBD

Social Exclusion and Human Rights
Hiroshi Nishihara, Waseda University
POLSCI 290A
PUBPOL 390A
SOCIOL 290A

Training in UNESCO World Heritage Studies
Giorgio Gianighian, Università Iuav di Venezia
CULANTH 290A (ALP, SS)
PUBPOL 390A (ALP, SS)

INTERNSHIPS

Following the semester of courses at VIU, selected students are offered internships at research centers, universities, cultural organizations and companies in Italy. VIU provides scholarships to contribute to the costs of international travel and accommodation. The internships are typically two to four months long, and take place either in January-February or during the summer months. 

Internships in Italy are currently available at the following organizations: 

  • Italian National Research Council (CNR) – conservation, restoration, archeology
  • La Biennale di Venezia – festivals of contemporary art, architecture, cinema, theater and dance 
  • Peggy Guggenheim Foundation - museum 
  • Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia – museums and libraries
  • Incroci di Civiltà – literary festival
  • Log607 – company applying innovative technology to cultural heritage 
  • Venezia Marketing e Eventi – promotion of cultural events

A similar list of host organizations for internships following the semester on Sustainable Development will be available soon. 

Housing and Meals

Housing

Students on the Duke in Venice program will have the option of choosing to stay on the VIU campus on the island of San Servolo or in an apartment in Venice.

Students who choose to reside on San Servolo will be housed in shared rooms on the island. Each room will have a private bath with shower. Laundry (coin-operated) and some kitchen facilities are available.

Apartment rentals arranged by VIU are available in the city. The apartments are for 4 students in two twin rooms. Estimated cost for the apartments is Euro 1,700 per semester, not including utilities and cleaning services. Apartments are out-fitted with fully equipped kitchens so that students can cook for themselves.

Meals

The meal plan consists of a set of vouchers that can be used in the VIU cafeteria (breakfast, lunch, and dinner Monday-Friday, public holidays excluded) and also in a wide network of cafés, restaurants, and supermarkets. The vouchers are valid nationwide, so students can use them while traveling in Italy.

Location

The island of San Servolo was the seat of a Benedictine Monastery as early as the 8th century and was transformed into a hospital in the mid-eighteenth century. Its buildings have been developed over the ages, mirroring themselves in the tranquil waters of the lagoon, and now cover an area of over sixteen thousand square meters, with a park approximately 10 acres large.

The island is located in the Venetian lagoon, between Venice's main city center and the island of Lido. It takes 10 minutes by boat to reach Piazza San Marco, the heart of Venice and 20 minutes to reach Venice International Airport Marco Polo.

San Servolo is a park-like oasis in a unique urban setting. Students can study, work, and relax among picturesque buildings, trees, and a peaceful park overlooking Venice and its magical atmosphere. In addition to this, students will have an extraordinary opportunity to study under conditions that are significantly different from their normal day-to-day studying environment. They will be given the chance to share their experiences and knowledge with students and scholars coming to San Servolo from all around the world.

 

 

 

 

DATES

Venice International University Calendar

  • Fall 2017
  • Spring 2018
  • FALL 2018
  • Spring 2019
  • FALL 2019

Fall 2017

Fall 2017

Arrival on VIU Campus: September 3
Orientation Week: September 4-8
Opening Ceremony: September 7
Courses Begin: September 11
Midterm Break: Oct 30-Nov 3
Courses End: December 18
Exam Week: December 11-15
Check Out: December 18
 

National holidays: November 1, November 21, December 8

Spring 2018

Spring 2018

Arrival on VIU Campus: February 18
Orientation Week: February 19-23
Opening Ceremony: February 22
Courses Begin: February 26
Midterm Break: April 2-6
Courses End: May 25
Exam week: May 28-June 1
Check Out: June 1
 

National Holidays: April 2, April 25, May 1

FALL 2018

Fall 2018

Arrival on VIU Campus: September 9
Orientation Week: September 10-14
Opening Ceremony: September 13
Courses Begin: September 17
Midterm Break: Oct 29-Nov 2
Courses End: December 14
Exam Week: December 17-21
Check Out: December 21
 

National holidays: November 1, November 21, December 8

Spring 2019

Spring 2019

Arrival on VIU Campus: February 17
Orientation Week: February 18-22
Opening Ceremony: February 21
Courses Begin: February 25
Midterm Break: April 22-26
Courses End: May 24
Exam week: May 27-May 31
Check Out: May 31
 

National Holidays: April 22, April 25, May 1

FALL 2019

Fall 2019

Arrival on VIU Campus: September 8
Orientation Week: September 9-13
Opening Ceremony: September 12
Courses Begin: September 16
Midterm Break: Oct 28-Nov 1
Courses End: December 13
Exam Week: December 16-20
Check Out: December 21

ESTIMATED COSTS

Fall 2017 or Spring 2018

Estimates are based on previous years’ programs and the current exchange rate. All costs are subject to change.

  Duke Students Non-Duke Students
Tuition $25,860 $25,860
Program Fee $2,000 $2,000
Transcript Fee N/A $40
Other Costs

Other Costs - Fall
Other Costs - Spring

Other Costs - Fall
Other Costs - Spring

TOTAL (Estimated) $33,940 $33,980

Program Fee

The program fee for this program includes:

  • Accommodations on the island*
  • Weekday meals*
  • International SOS coverage
  • Program-sponsored activities and excursions
  • Orientation program


*Students who choose the city apartment housing option should be aware that they will need to pay utilities and a security deposit. The security deposit will be refunded to them at the end of the program if there is no damage to the apartment. In addition, students who chose the apartment option will receive fewer meal vouchers, as they will not be taking breakfast on the island but instead will be self-catering in their residences for breakfast.

Not Included in Program Fee

Use the following list to assist with budgeting for expenses outside the program fee. This list contains common examples but should not be considered exhaustive.

The program fee does not include:

  • Airfare
  • Airport transportation to/from program site
  • Local transportation
  • Weekend meals
  • On-site accident and health insurance policy
  • Out-of-pocket medical expenses
  • Immunizations
  • Visa and/or residency permit
  • Passport
  • Textbooks and class materials
  • Internet usage
  • Mobile phone
  • Laundry
  • Independent travel and entertainment
  • Items of a personal nature
  • Incidentals

Students who choose the city apartment housing option should be aware that they will need to pay utilities and a security deposit. The security deposit will be refunded to them at the end of the program if there is no damage to the apartment. In addition, students who chose the apartment option will receive fewer meal vouchers, as they will not be taking breakfast on the island but instead will be self-catering in their residences for breakfast.

Personal Spending

Personal expenses can fluctuate greatly depending upon habits and preferences of the individual. It’s also wise to budget for unexpected expenses such as medical emergencies. 

Cost-of-living comparison

Payment Due Dates

Step 1: Within 3 weeks of acceptance to the program, confirm your enrollment by submitting the non-refundable $1,000 deposit. Deposits are payable by check or Student Account E-Check. If you receive Duke financial aid, submit the Deposit Waiver Form in lieu of the deposit. Log in to MyGlobalEd for remittance instructions or waiver form.

NOTE: If you withdraw after committing to the program, your deposit will be retained or $1,000 will be charged to your Bursar account.

Step 2: Complete all post-acceptance items listed on your MyGlobalEd application, including the Participation Agreement, Pre-Departure Orientation, International Travel Registry, and any program-specific forms.

Step 3: Semester invoices will be sent via email to your Duke email address and home email address. Remit payment to the Bursar per due date and address indicated on your online statement. All financial arrangements involving Duke University must be completed prior to departure for the program.

Duke Bursar’s Office

Financial Aid

Duke students receiving financial aid are eligible for aid for this program (work-study funds must be converted to loans). Students are individually responsible for making the necessary arrangements with the Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid and the Bursar. Non-Duke students are not eligible to receive financial aid at Duke and should contact their home institutions for financial aid information.

Duke Financial Aid Office

Duke Bursar’s Office

FACULTY & STAFF

Susan Pratt

GEO Asst. Director & Regional Manager

ADMISSIONS

Deadline: March 1, 2018 (Fall semester) or October 1, 2018 (Spring semester)

This program has rolling admission. Applications will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis until the program fills; after that, qualified students are added to a waitlist and notified of openings. Applications must be received by the deadline to be considered. Application opens November 1.

Priority: Priority will be given to juniors and seniors having an overall GPA of 3.0. Priority is also given to applicants who apply early.

Minimum GPA: The minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) required for Duke students wishing to study away during the semester is 2.7 (3.0 for Pratt students) on a scale of 4.0. See Academics section for details.

Non-Duke students: Non-Duke students are welcome to apply for this program. You must be a degree-seeking student in good standing at an accredited college or university. Consult your university’s registrar and/or study away advisor for assistance with transfer credit. Students who are not matriculated at a college or university are not eligible to participate in Duke’s study away programs.

All applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation or preference, gender or age.

APPLY

Start your application early to ensure that it is complete by the deadline! Incomplete applications will not be forwarded to the program directors for consideration.

Submit the following items using MyGlobalEd

  1. Online application
  2. Official transcript(s) from all colleges and universities attended.
  3. Personal statement, no longer than one page, explaining why you would like to participate on this program
  4. Two academic letters of recommendation