Duke Semester in India

Explore the multi-faceted systems of today’s India

Study public policy and global health with leading practitioners and world-renowned NGOs

The Duke Semester in India provides students with an intense, immersive experience through which they will study health, poverty, and conservation in the classroom and in the field.

The program is divided into two seven-week segments. The first takes place in Udaipur, a city of 600,000 in the Indian state of Rajasthan. There, students will study development, poverty, and rural health, studying and researching both in the city and rural villages. They will live with families in Udaipur and in the villages, as well as work with local university students who will act as guides and translators on class research assignments.

Then, students will travel to Bangalore, a city of 4.3 million in the Indian state of Karnataka, where they will study conservation, the environment, and their interaction with health and health systems. They will have the opportunity to experience actual fieldwork through multi-day stays in wildlife preserves, tiger reserves, and national parks. While there, they will participate in assignments related to conservation and health, interacting with both indigenous populations and local wildlife.

At the same time, students will discover Indian culture and people. How much spice can you take in your food? How do Indians celebrate holidays? How come there are so many palaces and forts? Why are the languages so completely different in Udaipur (Hindi) and Bangalore (Kanada)?

Through immersion both in and out of the classroom, students will get a close look at how the environment and poverty affect individuals and society. It is a different experience that a student might have on other study away programs. It might also be life-changing.

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  • ACADEMICS
  • ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION
  • FACULTY

ACADEMICS

Students will enroll in four courses, earning four Duke course credits (suggested value of 16 semester credits). All courses are considered to be Duke courses, and all grades earned will factor in the Duke GPA.

Two development-themed courses will combine readings, classroom discussions, and direct examinations of the situation on the ground to provide a holistic, practice-oriented understanding. A substantial part of a student’s grade will derive from independent research projects, for which students will focus on a specific issue area, selecting a particular problem (or opportunity) related to education, health, the environment, gender relations, microfinance, or other related concern.

PUBPOL 390A/HISTORY 390A  Shifting Identities in Indian History (SS, CZ) Instructor: Mary Storm, Ph.D.

This course will introduce students to broad themes of Indian identity in religion, politics, and the arts. Students will gain a deeper understanding of Indian historic context, aesthetic theories and religious structures against a long trajectory of culture shifts, through lectures, readings, site visits, presentations, and discussions. Through this course, students will also develop analytical skills in a new environment, and acquire an appreciation for cultural difference in addressing universal problems. Worth one Duke credit.

ENVIRON 290A / PUBPOL 390A (SS) Conserving Wild India Amidst A Booming Economy and a Billion People Instructor: Krithi Karanth, Ph.D. of Centre for Wildlife Studies, Bangalore, India

This class will look at different approaches to conservation and analytically examine solutions in the Indian context. Guest lectures by practitioners and academics along with field experiences in Bhadra, Kudremukha, and BRT Tiger Reserves will help students engage with and learn about different perspectives and modes of intervention in Indian conservation. Worth one Duke credit.

Click here for more information. 

Two global health-themed courses will be offered, one in Udaipur and one in Bangalore.

PUBPOL 390A/ GLHTH 390A (SS, STS, CCI)

Of Highways and Rural Roads: Delivering Health Care to the Poor in India  Instructors: Sharad Iyengar, M.D. and Kirti Iyengar, M.D., of Action, Research, Training in Health (ARTH)

The course on global health will explore the key elements of ill health in India, and examine its intersections with poverty, gender, social marginalization and economic change. In addition, it will explore how changes in lifestyle brought on by urbanization and a consumer economy have influenced the onset of health problems and care-seeking, and the role of health systems in mitigating or aggravating health problems. Among the questions it will address are, what systemic factors influence people’s access to health care and its quality, and how do families negotiate better health for themselves? Lastly, is there light at the end of the tunnel? Worth one Duke credit.

GLHTH 390A / PUBPOL 390A (SS, CCI) Beyond pills for poverty: Understanding health systems and social determinants of health Instructors: NS Prashanth, MBBS, MPH, PhD (to be completed in 2014) and Tanya Seshadri, MBBS, MD (Community medicine).

Note: this course fulfills the Social Determinants of Global Health Foundations requirements in the global health co-major.

Analysing health systems:

In this first part of this course, participants will be introduced to the various components of a health system and how they interact. Participants will learn to analyse the several components and features of a health system by comparing between the present health systems in India and a few other countries. Through visits to health facilities and an urban slum in Bangalore and a review of literature, participants will analyse the local health system and discuss possible systemic reasons for its poor performance. The first part will focus on urban health with a focus on the challenges of organizing health care in large cities. Participants will also visit institutions and discuss with guest lecturers about specific disease-control programmes being implemented in response to communicable diseases. In contrast to this, they will also be exposed to current status and efforts towards responding to non-communicable diseases. This part shall focus on the health services component of the health system.

Health systems as if social determinants matter:

In the final part of the course, participants will deepen their understanding of social determinants of health. Health systems strengthening cannot merely be a technical process of engineering the several components of the health services and policy. In order for a healthy society, several of the social determinants of health need to be addressed; and often the solutions lie outside of the scope and influence of a health service. In this final part, participants travel to a tiger reserve 200 km south of Bangalore to see first-hand the development activities undertaken by a community-based non-governmental organization, Vivekananda Girijana Kalyana Kendra (VGKK), which works among the Soliga people, an indigenous tribal community that lives in and around the forests of Biligirirangan hills (BR hills). Over the last three decades, VGKK has strived to organize health, education, and livelihood security for the Soliga people. Participants will interact with several Soliga tribal leaders and beneficiaries of VGKK and try to understand how healthcare is determined not only by pills and medicines, but also by a variety of other social factors—poverty, livelihood security, and community participation and empowerment. Through a mix of case studies, one-to-one interactions, visits to tribal settlements, hospitals and schools in the area, participants will gain a first-hand experience into how social determinants influence health outcomes. Worth one Duke credit.

Click here for more information.

ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION

ENVIRON 290A / PUBPOL 390A (SS) Conserving Wild India Amidst A Booming Economy and a Billion People

Instructor: Krithi Karanth, Ph.D. of Centre for Wildlife Studies, Bangalore, India

This class will look at different approaches to conservation and analytically examine solutions in the Indian context. Guest lectures by practitioners and academics along with field experiences in Bhadra, Kudremukha, and BRT Tiger Reserves will help students engage with and learn about different perspectives and modes of intervention in Indian conservation.

India is home to some of the world’s most charismatic species including the largest populations of tigers and Asian elephants. With just 3% of land set aside as protected areas and an economy growing at 7% annually, the challenges to make conservation work are immense. Particularly, in the context of 70% of rural India where many people live in abject poverty (earning less than $2 a day) but live in close proximity to wild India. This course seeks to examine to understand what is conservation in human-dominated context. How do we achieve conservation goals of protecting endangered species and ecosystems and maintain viable landscapes while understanding the complex links between conservation and development? Can we conserve wildlife and wild nature while allowing for economic and developmental aspirations of billions of people? Intense and acerbic debates among academics and policymakers have resulted in attempts to address the problems of conservation in India.

GLHTH 390A / PUBPOL 390A (SS, CCI) Beyond pills for poverty: Understanding health systems and social determinants of health

 

Instructors: NS Prashanth, MBBS, MPH, PhD (to be completed in 2014) and Tanya Seshadri, MBBS, MD (Community medicine)

 

India has the dubious distinction of being a nuclear power where mothers unavoidably die in childbirth and malnutrition deprives children of food and their future. While the economic development pulls people from rural areas into poorly planned and densely populated cities in search of livelihoods, rural India grapples with problems of access to affordable and good quality health services and a severe shortage of trained health workers (doctors, nurses, and para-medical workers). While government provides health services in the form of primary health centres and hospitals, private sector ranging from unqualified practitioners to large corporate hospitals operate simultaneously resulting in a fragmented health system. Patients are largely left to themselves to choose their point of care depending on their income, habitation, and their own perceptions of where to seek care for a particular health problem. Several societal factors influence these in addition; a system of caste and discrimination results in socially excluded and marginalized communities and, often, poor health is merely an outcome of a larger social exclusionary process while, in other cases, it may in fact contribute to further emaciation of communities.

Note: This course fulfills the Social Determinants of Global Health Foundations requirements in the global health co-major.

Analysing health systems:

In this first part of this course, participants will be introduced to the various components of a health system and how they interact. Participants will learn to analyse the several components and features of a health system by comparing between the present health systems in India and a few other countries. Through visits to health facilities and an urban slum in Bangalore and a review of literature, participants will analyse the local health system and discuss possible systemic reasons for its poor performance. The first part will focus on urban health with a focus on the challenges of organizing health care in large cities. Participants will also visit institutions and discuss with guest lecturers about specific disease-control programmes being implemented in response to communicable diseases. In contrast to this, they will also be exposed to current status and efforts towards responding to non-communicable diseases. This part shall focus on the health services component of the health system.

Health systems as if social determinants matter:

In the final part of the course, participants will deepen their understanding of social determinants of health. Health system strengthening cannot merely be a technical process of engineering the several components of the health services and policy. In order for a healthy society, several of the social determinants of health need to be addressed; and often the solutions lie outside of the scope and influence of a health service. In this final part, participants travel to a tiger reserve 200 km south of Bangalore to see first-hand the development activities undertaken by a community-based non-governmental organization, Vivekananda Girijana Kalyana Kendra (VGKK), which works among theSoliga people, an indigenous tribal community that lives in and around the forests of Biligirirangan hills (BR hills). Over the last three decades, VGKK has strived to organize health, education, and livelihood security for the Soliga people. Participants will interact with several Soliga tribal leaders and beneficiaries of VGKK and try to understand how healthcare is determined not only by pills and medicines, but also by a variety of other social factors—poverty, livelihood security, and community participation and empowerment. Through a mix of case studies, one-to-one interactions, visits to tribal settlements, hospitals and schools in the area, participants will gain a first-hand experience into how social determinants influence health outcomes.

FACULTY

Dr. Kenneth Rogerson

Kenneth Rogerson is associate professor of the practice of public policy and the director of undergraduate studies for the Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. He serves as the managing director of the Policy Journalism and Media Studies Certificate program. From 1998-2007 he was the research director for the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy.

Recent publications include articles on the use of the Internet in political advocacy and social movements, privacy and the Internet, and a comparative study of information flow policies in democratic and authoritarian societies. One of his articles, published in International Politics, “Talking Past Each Other: International Organization Internet Policy in the Developing World,” was recognized as the Best Article by the Information Technology and Politics (ITP) Section of the American Politics Science Association (APSA).

He is past president of the International Communication Section of the International Studies Association and APSA’s Information, Technology, and Politics Section. He has served on an advisory board for the Rural Internet Access Authority for the state of North Carolina. He received his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 2000 where his research focused on international relations, international communications, and media policy issues.

Ken was a reporter for the Deseret News in Salt Lake City, Utah, and currently teaches course on technology policy, news writing and reporting, and other media issues.

Dr. Mary Storm - Udaipur

Mary Storm completed her MA in East Asian Studies at Stanford University, and her PhD in South Asian Art History at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. She was a visiting professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Dehli, and has previously served as the academic director for two study abroad programs in India.

Dr. Sharad and Dr. Kirti Iyengar, co-founders of Action Research and Training for Health (ARTH) NGO - Udaipur

Instructors for the second course in Udaipur, Health of the Poor: The Burden and Response in India, will be Drs. Kirti and Sharad Iyengar, both medical doctors and founders of the NGO Action Research and Training for Health (ARTH) in Udaipur, India.

With an M.D. in Medicine followed by a graduate degree in Public Health, Sharad Iyengar worked for several years with the United Nations in India and abroad. He quit this position more than ten years ago and set up, together with his wife, Dr. Kirti Iyengar (also an M.D. with an advanced degree in Public Health) an NGO in Udaipur by the name of Action Research and Training for Health or ARTH. ARTH has extensive field operations in two parts of Udaipur, serving, through a variety of preventative and curative public health interventions, a population of more than 55,000 people. Additionally, they have active training and research programs, running regular in-service training programs for both senior- and junior-level public health officials and engaging in action research that has resulted in published articles in national and international journals. Sharad serves on committees of the World Health Organization and the Indian Council of Medical Research. His active involvement at the grassroots is matched by his engagement in the worlds of policymaking and advocacy. ARTH was the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Award in 2011.

Dr. Krithi K. Karanth - Bangalore

Krithi, a Duke alumnus (Ramanujan Fellow, Government of India), is also Executive Director of the Centre for Wildlife Studies, Adjunct Assistant Professor at Duke University. She has a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy from Duke University (2008), a Master's degree in Environmental Science from Yale (2003), and B.S. (Environmental Science) and B.A. (Geography) degrees from the University of Florida (2001). Krithi's research in India has spanned over 12 years and encompasses a broad range of issues examining human dimensions of wildlife conservation. She has conducted macro-level studies assessing patterns of mammal extinctions in India; impacts of wildlife tourism in reserves; sociological consequences of voluntary resettlement; and, more recently, on understanding ecological and social dimensions of human-wildlife conflicts and land use change. She has published over 35 scientific and popular articles. She has received grants and awards from the National Science Foundation, Indian Government, Society for Conservation Biology, National Geographic Society as well as Yale, Duke, Columbia, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Cambridge. She was honored as National Geographic Society's 10,000th grantee in 2011 and Emerging Explorer for 2012. She was also selected to be among India's Power Women by Femina (2012) and Women of the year by Elle India (2013). She was recognized by University of Florida as an Oustanding Young Alumnus in 2013.

Dr. Prashanth N. Srinivas - Bangalore

Prashanth is a medical doctor with an interest and specialisation in public health. He is presently a Faculty and PhD Fellow at the Institute of Public Health, Bangalore. He obtained his masters in public health from Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. He is presently doing his PhD at the same institute. For his PhD, he is studying district level capacity-building in planning and supervision of health services at district and talukas in Karnataka in South India. His research interests within public health are mainly in health systems focusing on scientific evaluation of health programmes. He is also involved in health systems strengthening initiatives at the district level. He has worked as a doctor in primary health care in a forest area in Southern India (BR Hills), where he played a critical role in strengthening community health initiatives at Vivekananda Girijana Kalyana Kendra (VGKK). He was closely involved in dialogues with community leaders of the Soliga tribal people on health, livelihoods, and conservation issues. He has helped set up community health and eHealth initiatives in forest-dwelling and remote areas in Northeast India. He continues to support the work of VGKK in a voluntary and advisory capacity. He is an avid birdwatcher and travels and writes on topics related to wildlife conservation, health, development, and public policy. He has been an editor in the English Wikipedia since 2006 and is a frequent contributor of photographs to Wikimedia Commons. He blogs about life, universe, and everything (else) at daktre.com.

Dr. Tanya Seshadri - Bangalore

Tanya is a medical doctor with a specialisation in community medicine from Christian Medical College, Vellore. She is presently working on understanding social exclusion especially in health through a study of the Indian government's Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), a health insurance scheme for people below poverty line. She has worked in and managed primary and secondary care facilities in rural and remote areas in south India and northeast India. She also has experience of working closely with health teams at district and taluka levels.

  • LOCATION
  • HOUSING
  • ACTIVITIES
  • VISAS
  • FIELD STUDY

LOCATION

Duke Semester in India Location

Udaipur, India

Founded in 1568 and located in the central Indian state of Rajasthan, Udaipur, with a population in 2001 of 550,000 people, is well connected by air, road, and rail.

Because of its rich architectural and historic heritage and the natural beauty provided by its five lakes and surrounding hills, Udaipur is a popular tourist destination. In May 2009, Udaipur was voted the world's best city for travelers in an online poll conducted by Travel and Leisure magazine—ahead of Cape Town, Bangkok, and Buenos Aires. The Lonely Planet Guide describes it as “A cupola-crowned city of cream, rose, and honeysuckle hues…considered by many as the most romantic city in India…a center for arts, craft, and dance with a renowned school of miniature painting…and a great place to shop.” These aspects, while clearly important for a first-time visitor to India, are hardly central to the selection of Udaipur as a preferred location for the Duke Semester in India.

More important, Udaipur is a hub in India for well-regarded NGOs and government organizations working on important aspects of development and public health, including several that have won national and international acclaim. It is abutted by a rural countryside that, while charming and pretty, is home to some of the poorest people in India. Working alongside the organizations that have agreed to partner with us in this enterprise, our students will have diverse opportunities for meaningful community engagement, service learning, cross-cultural inquiry, and independent field study projects.

Bangalore, India

Bangalore, the capital city in the southern state of Karnataka, is the setting for the second half of the program. Like many major cities in India, it represents the extremes wrought by fast-paced economic development and globalization. Although Bangalore is one of the top emerging urban centers in India and the country’s hub for information technology, a significant portion of the population remains in slums. Issues of pollution, insufficient infrastructure, and inaccessibility of health services are extensive.

Both locales offer students diverse opportunities for meaningful community engagement, service learning, and cross-cultural inquiry.

HOUSING

Duke Semester in India Housing

Udaipur and villages

In Rajasthan, students live and receive meals with carefully selected families in Udaipur and rural areas. In Udaipur, students are housed one per household. At a minimum, rooms are equipped with a bed, a wardrobe, and a comfortable study area such as a desk or table.

Bangalore

While in Bangalore, students will stay in a service hotel within walking distance from the CWS (Center for Wildlife Studies) office where classes will be held.

While students are on special excursions to locations such as Mysore, Bhadra, BRT Hills, Bandipur, etc, they will be staying in a variety of accommodations including hotels, lodges, and field stations.

ACTIVITIES

Students participate in cultural activities and observe local traditions and celebrations such as Diwali (Indian festival of lights) and Janamashtami, a major Hindu festival. Students also enjoy a variety of excursions in and around the various program sites (Udaipur and Bangalore) including trips to tiger sanctuaries in southern India as well as indigeneous villages.

A mid-semester four day excursion to Jaipur and Agra (location of the Taj Mahal) is included.

Students will also be able to take a few non-credit-bearing Hindi and Kannada survival language classes during the program. While in Bangalore, students will have the opportunity to participate in a photography workshop.

VISAS

Participants will need to secure the necessary student visas from the government of India. The program will assist with logistics in visa matters, but it is ultimately up to the individual student to obtain the necessary visa.

Students planning to attend the Duke Semester in India (DSI) program should consider the following:

Is your passport valid for at least six months after the end date of the DSI program? If not, please renew your passport now. All participants should have valid passports available by the start of the fall semester prior to DSI.

Are you participating in another program or activity involving international travel in the two months prior to the start of the DSI? If so, please consider requesting a duplicate U.S. passport (if a U.S. citizen) or contact the Global Education Office for Undergraduates to discuss logistics.

Are you of Pakistani descent? If so, please be aware that additional visa requirements may apply for the Indian visa and that processing times for each step of the visa process will take longer than the published times. Please contact the Global Education Office for Undergraduates for more information.

U.S. citizens who need to obtain or renew visas should contact the U.S. Department of State. Non-U.S. citizens should contact agents in their home countries.

FIELD STUDY

Udaipur

In Udaipur students conduct community-based field study and service with pre-selected NGOs. Students are assigned to the NGOs in pairs. A short seminar on field study methods help prepare the students for these assignments. Translators are provided.

A list of NGOs and possible projects will be sent to accepted students in late spring.

Bangalore

Centre for Wildlife Studies

The Centre for Wildlife Studies (CWS) is a non-profit trust based in Bangalore, India. Inspired by the pioneering tiger studies of Dr. George Schaller of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) New York, founder-trustee Dr. Ullas Karanth established CWS in 1984. Centre for Wildlife Studies is now an internationally recognized centre of excellence in the arenas of wildlife research, training, formal education, and conservation. Centre for Wildlife Studies practices science-based conservation with special emphasis on the ecology and conservation of the tiger and other large mammals. CWS works in collaboration with Central and State Governments in India to promote conservation of wildlife and wild lands and is additionally supported by several international and national charities, agencies, and donors. CWS has implemented several projects involving wildlife research, education, training, outreach, and site-based conservation at regional and national levels. CWS believes that wildlife conservation involves long-term work at key conservation sites and therefore focuses on education and capacity-building of Indian nationals and civil society groups. For more details see www.cwsindia.org.

Institute for Public Health

The Institute of Public Health, Bangalore, is a public health research and training institute based in Bangalore, India. We are a non-profit organisation established with a vision of creating an equitable, integrated, decentralized, and participatory health system within a just and empowered society. IPH is mainly involved in health systems research and is committed to improving service delivery in the government health services with the aim of improving health care for the community. IPH engages in health systems research to strengthen urban and district level local health systems. Through institutional collaborations with other institutes in India and elsewhere, IPH has undertaken research in several areas including health policy (maternal and child health policies), health financing (health insurance and universal health coverage), health services, and in urban health. The institute organises training programmes at the district level and conducts workshops for several state governments in India. IPH organises a national conference on bringing evidence into public health policy (EPHP conference) once in two years, the largest gathering of public health researchers and policymakers in one place in India. The institute is well known for its advocacy based on their research on issues related to universal health coverage, tobacco control, and governance. For more details, see http://www.iphindia.org.

Updated: 28 March 2013

  • CALENDAR

CALENDAR

The dates for the 2015 Duke Semester in India are as follows:

2015 Duke Semester in India
August 23** Arrival to New Delhi, India
August 24 Travel from Delhi to Udaipur
October 15 Mid-program trip (Udaipur-Jaipur-Agra-Delhi)
October 20 Depart Delhi for Bangalore
December 31* Departure from New Delhi, India

**Please check specifics with program office at GEO before purchasing tickets. We have a definite time frame for arrivals.

Please note that no late arrivals or early departures are allowed due to the complexity and intensive nature of programming in both locations.

Travel during the semester should be cleared with the appropriate on-site directors in advance of purchasing tickets or confirming plans. Many weekends will involve program-sponsored travel or research activities.

ESTIMATED COSTS

Fall 2015

Estimates are based on previous years’ programs and the current exchange rate. All costs are subject to change.

  Duke Students Non-Duke Students
Tuition $23,825.00 $23,825.00
Program Fee $2,200.00 $2,200.00
Transcript Fee N/A $40.00
Other Costs Other Costs Other Costs
TOTAL (Estimated) TBD TBD

Included in Program Fee

The program fee for this program includes: 

  • Airport transportation from Delhi (beginning of program)
  • Accommodations in Udaipur, Bangalore and while on programmatic excursions
  • USB Dongle in Udaipur for Internet access
  • Most meals while in Udaipur (breakfast/lunch/dinner during homestays) and in Bangalore (lunches during class time and three meals per day during excursions provided).
  • International SOS coverage 
  • Program-sponsored activities and excursions
  • Orientation program

Not Included in Program Fee

Use the following list to assist with budgeting for expenses outside the program fee. This list contains common examples but should not be considered exhaustive. 

The program fee does not include: 

  • International round-trip Airfare
  • Airport transportation from Bangalore at end of program
  • On-site accident and health insurance policy
  • Out-of-pocket medical expenses
  • Immunizations
  • Visa and/or residency permit
  • Passport
  • Textbooks and class materials
  • Laundry
  • Internet usage
  • Mobile phone
  • Independent travel and entertainment
  • Items of a personal nature
  • Incidentals

Personal Spending

Personal expenses can fluctuate greatly depending upon habits and preferences of the individual. It’s also wise to budget for unexpected expenses such as medical emergencies. On average, previous students suggest the amount between $___ - $___ for personal spending. 

Cost-of-living comparison

Payment Due Dates

Step 1: Within 3 weeks of acceptance to the program, confirm your enrollment by submitting the non-refundable $1,000 deposit ($1,040 for non-Duke students). Deposits are payable by check or Student Account E-Check. If you receive Duke financial aid, submit the Deposit Waiver Form in lieu of the deposit. Log in to MyGlobalEd for remittance instructions or waiver form.

NOTE: If you withdraw after committing to the program, your deposit will be retained or $1,000 will be charged to your Bursar account. 

Step 2: Complete all post-acceptance items listed on your MyGlobalEd application, including the Participation Agreement, Pre-Departure Orientation, International Travel Registry, and any program-specific forms. 

Step 3: Semester invoices will be sent via email to your Duke email address and home email address. Remit payment to the Bursar per due date and address indicated on your online statement. All financial arrangements involving Duke University must be completed prior to departure for the program.

Duke Bursar’s Office

Financial Aid

Duke students receiving financial aid are eligible for aid for this program (work-study funds must be converted to loans). Students are individually responsible for making the necessary arrangements with the Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid and the Bursar. Non-Duke students are not eligible to receive financial aid at Duke and should contact their home institutions for financial aid information.

Duke Financial Aid Office

Duke Bursar’s Office

CONTACT US

Duke Semester in India (DSI)
Global Education Office for Undergraduates (GEO-U)
Smith Warehouse
Bay 6, 2nd Floor
114 S. Buchanan Blvd., Box 90057
Durham, NC 27708-0057
Tel. 919-684-2174
Fax. 919-684-3083
Email: globaled@duke.edu

Program Administration

The DSI staff at Duke is available to answer questions you might have about the program.

Paul Paparella

GEO Asst. Director & Regional Manager

Kenneth Rogerson

Associate Professor of the Practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy

APPLY

Apply Now

*Please note that this semester program has been put on hiatus for 2016 and will be offered in fall 2017.*

The application for Duke Semester in India 2017 is currently open. Students can apply by going to at MyGlobalEd (search for Duke Semester in India, and at the program brochure page, click "Apply Now" to begin the application).

Students applying to this program should submit the following items to the Global Education Office for Undergraduates no later than March 1, 2017:

  1. Online application
  2. Official transcript(s) from all colleges and universities attended
  3. Personal statement, no longer than one page, explaining why you wish to participate on this program
  4. Two faculty (academic) letters of recommendation

Eligibility

All applicants must be university students in good academic standing at the sophomore, junior, or senior level. There are no admissions pre-requisites for the program, but an introductory course in global health is recommended. 

Duke University welcomes applicants from accredited colleges and universities. All applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, national and ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation or preference, gender or age.

Duke University reserves the right to make program changes if necessary.